Category: Continued After Next Page

Continued After the Next Page #005: Best Single Issue Ever NTT #38

Continued After the Next Page #005: Best Single Issue Ever NTT #38

Welcome back to “Continued After the Next Page”. If you are new here, we try to shine a spotlight on stories and comic book nostalgia from the past. Today we are going to talk about just one comic book. In my opinion, it is the greatest single issue that I have ever read. Now, that is a lofty perch on which I have just placed this book, and I am willing to listen to other suggestions, of course. However, this issue, which is a one-and-done story, strikes such emotional tones that I cannot find a book that tops it.

The book in question is The New Teen Titans #38. It was released in late 1983 with a January 1984 date stamped on the cover. The issue was co-plotted by Marv Wolfman and George Perez with a script from Marv and art by George and Romeo Tanghal. Sadly, letterer Ben Oda, colorist Adrienne Roy, and editor Len Wein have all passed on by now. If you are going to call something that is the product of a collaborative effort “the best of its kind”, then that thing should display a high level of talent from the individual collaborators that is independently identifiable, but is even better in the context of the complete collective work. This book certainly accomplished that goal. Continue reading “Continued After the Next Page #005: Best Single Issue Ever NTT #38”

Continued After the Next Page #004: When Thor Rode the Bus

Continued After the Next Page #004: When Thor Rode the Bus

Comic books today are made in vastly different ways than the were in years past. Scripts are emailed; pencils are done on tablets and then emailed or shared again across the internet; colors and letters are handled digitally. Of course, I am generalizing, but the point is that, in the world we live in, the creators of comic books have evolved to take advantage of the technology available to them. In this column, I want to remind us of the interesting events that surrounded the physical creation of the comics we read in the past.

I had the great opportunity to meet legendary artist/writer/letterer John Workman at a convention last year. He shared an amazing story with me, and recently we spoke again about it and many other comic and non-comic topics. In the coming weeks, here on Pop Culture Squad, I will be sharing the interview as a whole, but today, I would like to share with you a few humorous and fascinating stories related to the methods that John employed in getting the art, words, and color on the Bristol board pages that made the comics of old.

John Workman has been a frequent collaborator with the great Walter Simonson throughout the years. John was the letterer on the entirety of Walt’s remarkable run on Thor in the 80’s (1983-1987). They are still working together on the creator-owned Ragnarok, for which John is nominated for both Eisner and Ringo Awards this year. I asked John to recount the tale of how he and Walt would pass the comic pages back and forth back in the day:

Thor Rode the Bus Continue reading “Continued After the Next Page #004: When Thor Rode the Bus”

Continued After the Next Page #003: Comic Coincidence and Paul Gulacy

Continued After the Next Page #003: Comic Coincidence and Paul Gulacy

Comic books have been an important part of my life for over thirty-five years now. The things that I have read and seen in those pages affect things in my mind and outlook that most people might not expect. Large parts of my worldview have been shaped by the topics and interesting characters that I have been exposed to by reading comics. Often, I find that pieces of information in my mind come directly from knowledge gleaned from the pages of the fantastical stories that I read growing up. Weird things that make no sense. For example, whenever I hear the word “oblivion”, there is some small part of my mind that remembers that I first learned that word reading J.M. DeMatteis’ Iceman mini-series as a kid.  The villain in the story was called Oblivion, and it has stuck with me. These type of odd combinations of knowledge and memory happen all the time. As my friend David, from my Local Comic Shop, reminded me once, “Everything comes back to comics.”

I’d like to share a strange set of circumstances that combined to bring comics from the past right to the present day in an amazing moment of coincidence.  This event Continue reading “Continued After the Next Page #003: Comic Coincidence and Paul Gulacy”

Continued After the Next Page #002: The Comic I Have Owned the Longest

Continued After the Next Page #002: The Comic I Have Owned the Longest

I began reading and collecting comic books when I was 8 years old in 1981.  I would get comics from my Aunt’s convenience store in Seaside Heights, NJ.  For the next few years, I would pick up comics from local convenience stores with spinner racks. For those who are from New Jersey or the Northeast, names like Krausers and Cumberland Farms were havens of comic goodness. One day, I found out that there was such a thing as a comic book store. A whole store devoted to comic books. I was in awe. By this time, at about 12 years old, I had started working in my Aunt’s store on Sunday mornings. I would put the Sunday newspapers together for $5 bucks per hour.  I had found that there was a Comic Shop in Lakewood, NJ. It was only in the next town. I somehow managed to convince my mother to take me to this magical place so that I could spend my hard-earned dollars on comic goodness.  I am sure I spent way longer than my mom would have liked perusing the stacks and boxes to find a few bits of awesomeness. Most likely, I picked up some New Teen Titans that I had not read or old copies of the Legion of Super-Heroes.  At one point, I saw a flyer on the counter for a “Comic Convention” in Toms River, NJ. That is when my fandom for comics hit the accelerator and stayed glued to the floor.

Continue reading “Continued After the Next Page #002: The Comic I Have Owned the Longest”

Continued After the Next Page #001: Introduction

Continued After the Next Page #001: Introduction

“Continued After the Next Page” is the title that we came up with for this column. What does it mean?

Well, If you have to ask that, then most likely you started reading comics after 1990 and haven’t reached into the past. And truly, this column is about reaching into the past. It is about sharing stories and experiences. It is about celebrating comic fandom.  The main topics we will cover here are experiences interacting with the historical culture of comic books.  There will be reviews and reminiscing about classic or meaningful comic issues or stories. There will be interviews with comic book professionals from the past and present.  Ultimately the goal is to remember what got a lot of people into reading comic books and how it led to the pop culture explosion that you can see all over this site.

The most important thing to know about this column is that it is not a grumpy old man screaming “Get off my lawn!!”  It is meant to be positive, supportive, and inclusive.

Continue reading “Continued After the Next Page #001: Introduction”